Chemical Peels

By removing old skin, new layers can grow in its place resulting in a brighter, clearer, more youthful looking complexion. Chemical peels vary in strength, some can be performed during your lunch hour, while other stronger concentrations require a fair amount of recovery time. The stronger the peel, the more likely your skin is to look badly sunburned, blistered, and ultimately scab and peel. Chemical peels are very popular with people who want to reduce the appearance of deep wrinkles, sun damage and acne scarring. Even Bella Thorne publicly chronicled her chemical peel experience on social media.

What is Chemical Peel?

A chemical peel is a technique used to improve the appearance of the skin on the face, neck or hands. A chemical solution is applied to the skin that causes it to exfoliate and eventually peel off. The new, regenerated skin is usually smoother and less wrinkled than the old skin. The new skin is also temporarily more sensitive to the sun.

Types of Chemical Peels?

There are three basic types of chemical peels:

Superficial: Alpha-hydroxy acid or another mild acid is used to penetrate only the outer layer of skin to gently exfoliate it.
Medium peel: Glycolic or trichloroacetic acid is applied to penetrate the out and middle layers of skin to remove damaged skin cells.
Deep peel: Trichloroacetic acid or phenol is applied to deeply penetrate the middle layer of skin to remove damaged skin cells.

What are the benefits of chemical peels?

If performed correctly in appropriate patients, the appearance of the treated skin will have a more youthful texture with a uniform coloration that will blend with their untreated skin.

Why Chemical Peels?

There are a number of reasons people may get chemical peels. They may be trying to treat a variety of things, including:

  • Wrinkles and fine lines
  • Sun damage
  • Acne scars
  • Hyperpigmentation
  • Scars
  • Melasma
  • Uneven skin tone or redness