Root Canal

A root canal is a major procedure, so pain after a root canal is normal. A root canal involves deep cleaning inside the canals (the inner chamber of the root) of your tooth, which can in turn irritate surrounding nerves and gums. The pain shouldn’t last forever. In fact, a root canal is meant to help you avoid pain related to a decaying or fractured tooth. It’s normal to experience mild to moderate pain for a few days after a root canal.

What is Root Canal?

A root canal is a treatment to repair and save a badly damaged or infected tooth. The procedure involves removing the damaged area of the tooth (the pulp), cleaning and disinfecting it and then filling and sealing it. The common causes affecting the pulp are a cracked tooth, a deep cavity, repeated dental treatment to the tooth or trauma. The term "root canal" comes from cleaning of the canals inside the tooth's root.

What are the steps of Root Canal?

Root canal therapy is done in three steps, and it takes between one and three sessions to complete.

  • Cleaning the root canal
  • Filling the Root canal
  • Adding a crown or filling

When is a root canal needed?

A root canal is performed when the soft inner part of a tooth, known as the pulp, is injured or becomes inflamed or infected. The crown of the tooth — the part you can see above your gums — can remain intact even if the pulp is dead. Removing injured or infected pulp is the best way to preserve the structure of the tooth.

You may need root canal treatment for a number of reasons, including:

  • Severe tooth decay
  • Repeated dental treatment on the tooth
  • A cracked tooth
  • A broken crown
  • Cracked or loose fillings
  • Gum disease
  • An injury, such as a blow to your mouth