Dental Crown

Crown restorations are one of the most common dental procedures dentists perform. Every day, thousands of people have crowns placed to fix all kinds of tooth and mouth problems. Despite how common the procedure is, however, dental crowns are sometimes not very well understood. In fact, some people are intimidated or frightened by the prospect of having a crown restoration.

What are Dental Crowns?

A Dental Crown also called a Cap, fits over and replaces the entire decayed or damaged tooth above the gum line, restoring its shape, size, strength and appearance. Crowns keep a weak tooth from breaking or hold a cracked tooth together; they can be used cosmetically to cover misshapen or severely discolored teeth. Crowns can be made from metal, porcelain-fused-to-metal, resin or ceramic. Permanent crowns can be made from stainless steel, all metal (such as gold or another alloy), porcelain-fused-to-metal, all resin or all ceramic.

Several factors are important to consider when choosing a crown, including:

cost
strength
durability

Types of dental crowns:

Different kinds of materials can be used in crowns, including:

  • porcelain
  • ceramic
  • zirconia
  • metal
  • composite resin
  • a combination of materials

Who needs a crown?

If you have a large cavity that’s too big for a filling, it may be time for a crown. You may also need a crown if your tooth is:

  • severely worn down
  • cracked
  • weakened

Crowns are also recommended following a root canal on a tooth, because the tooth is more fragile and needs protection. You may be a candidate for a crown if you’re missing a tooth, and the dentist needs to put in a dental bridge or a tooth implant.

Your dentist wants your crown to look natural and fit comfortably in your mouth. To decide which material to use for your crown, your dentist will consider many factors, such as:

  • the tooth’s location and function
  • the position of the gum tissue
  • your preference
  • the amount of tooth that shows when you smile
  • the color or shade of the tooth